Winterizing an above ground system???

cold-beer

LawnSite Senior Member
I recently took on a new lawn care account, and they have an above ground 2 zone system with a timer connected straight to the faucet that came with the house they just moved into. The heads are just your typical above ground brass impact heads. The lines that feed them are Rain bird UV-resistant tubing I believe. The system also has a few 180 degree micro heads fed by what I believe is 1/4" line in the their flower bed. I'm not an irrigation guy obviously, but I told the customers that I would either winterize the the system or have it winterized if it needed it.

Does a generic above ground system like this need to be winterized? It looks like this was a kit of some sort.
 
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cold-beer

cold-beer

LawnSite Senior Member
If you want it to work the next year, and if you live in an area that freezes, then yes, it does.
So I guess my next question would be, what's the easiest way to winterize a system like this? I have a sprinkler guy that does a bunch of my accounts, but do I really need him on something like this? Can I just use my little contractors compressor or something? The longest run is probably 25 feet.
 

magna111

LawnSite Senior Member
Location
NJ
I recently took on a new lawn care account, and they have an above ground 2 zone system with a timer connected straight to the faucet that came with the house they just moved into. The heads are just your typical above ground brass impact heads. The lines that feed them are Rain bird UV-resistant tubing I believe. The system also has a few 180 degree micro heads fed by what I believe is 1/4" line in the their flower bed. I'm not an irrigation guy obviously, but I told the customers that I would either winterize the the system or have it winterized if it needed it.

Does a generic above ground system like this need to be winterized? It looks like this was a kit of some sort.
An above ground system is going to be much more vulnerable to freeze damage than and in ground system. If you’re talking about a pancake compressor that you’d use for nail guns, that’s not going to do a good job, and to do a mediocre job will take you forever.
 

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