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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 3 pictures that I'm going to post. These blades came off of a 61" Scag Turf Tiger. These blades haven't hit anything. As you will see it is 2 different kind of blades. Has any of you had blades to bend in this particular place? This is the 2nd set we have had do this.

Hood Motor vehicle Grille Automotive design Wood
 

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You hit something solid with that blade. The bow in the blade is just left of those big nicks (and I mean big). And I can tell that that blade is fairly new as well by the amount of cutting surface it has.

BTW, is it new or has it been sharpened yet?
 

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Originally posted by Meg-Mo
Try the MEG MO blades . The knives swing to avoid what happen to your blade.
I don't think he wants a different blade to try...he's trying to figure out what happened to this one.
 

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I have two sets of solid foil Excaliburs that have some damage (not the brand new notched ones in my thread from a couple days ago). I don't remember hitting anything hard or big enough to do that kind of damage, but nevertheless I have two trashed sets sitting in the shop :confused: Guess they just aren't that durable.
 

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I would definitely be yelling at my guys if I saw blades like that. I have never had blades bend like that under normal circumstances. Just from the look I would say something was definitely hit. :cool:
 

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Originally posted by rodfather
I don't think he wants a different blade to try...he's trying to figure out what happened to this one.
There is no doubt in my mind, that blade hit something solid.
 

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You cut GRASS with those blades?

Or ROCKS??? :confused:

They are in bad shape edge wise. Though it appears that you DID hit solid objects, numerous times, I believe that such a bend could occur from general thick grass and a high lift wing. Blades get hot while cutting and if your cutting a thick grass like the current crabgrass we've been seeing, it can happen. The blade is bending at its weak spot.

By the looks of it, its a fresh factory blade that hasn't been sharpened. Are these OEM SCAG Marbain blades? Or are they aftermarket cheapies?
 

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LOL fellas


the nicks in the blades are not all that bad. And look where the bend is

It's not where the nicks are.

Cheap steal and over heated when grinding. Not necessarily the grinding done by Speedy. Most likely when manufactured. That's what you get from after market suppliers
 

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That blade has hit some rocks. I do think that blade was not straight from day one though. I have seen several new blades from dealers to aftermarket that had about half that much bend.
I think the damage would have be worse to bend a blade that much. I have put similar nicks in a blade by running up on rocks but never bent the blade that bad.

where are the other two photos?

Jimbo
 

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Originally posted by TLS
Are these OEM SCAG Marbain blades? Or are they aftermarket cheapies?
Marbains have a solid foil (not the curved notch type like that one). That must be an aftermarket blade.

It looks to me like a piece of pipe or something got caught between the deck and the blade. Those are some pretty good nicks.....
 

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I know it sounds a little farfetched, but mowing thick, heavy grass creates alot of clippings under the deck, not to mention excessive heat from the increased friction of recutting all those clippings.

Do you mulch, or should I say is all the grass being discharged from under the deck? You may try slowing down a little.

As for the nicks in the blade, it looks normal (sticks, limbs, maybe even a small poodle was hit), but it looks like you have not sharpened them in about 40 or 50 hrs.

Just my $.02
 

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someone hit something hard,buried pipe,concrete,stone.I've seen this happen if the deck bottoms out in a hole or rut whlie cutting on a low setting.With some of these softer metals you 'd be suprised how little it takes to bend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the comments. This blade was actually a new blade. It has never been sharpened. This is an after market blade that I ordered off the Internet. Ordered 3 sets. This is the only set out of the 3 that did this except for the set of mulching blades, again ordered off the Internet. I'm like some of you, I believe it is cheap metal. Guess I'll stick to the name brands. The old saying goes..You get what you pay for..

Oh yea, sorry for not keeping it to one thread. My fault..
 

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See how the bend is in the flat metal, and not in the part of the blade with the wing, or by the nicks? The wing acts as a stiffener, so it’s not likely going to bend on the wing. Low-grade steel or lack of temper.

That blade hit something fairly solid. Both nicks could be the same object, if you account for the forward progress of the mower.

The edge bevel will pull the ends of the blade down whenever you contact something other than grass. Just churning into dirt will bend a blade like that, though probably not that much. If you mow thick heavy grass too fast, the blades will flex while cutting and cause a scalloped surface, requiring double cutting, but probably won’t permanently bend the blades.
 

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I've bent blades like that before. But only one tip, not all the tips on the whole set.

I run Toros and like Scag they have tapered roller bearings in their spindles. Probably the only machines capable of bending a blade like that without other damage like a bent spindle shaft.

I agree with the others who said it was something between the deck and the blade. Sod, big clumps of grass or for me it's always a hunk of wood that did it.

If you think inferior metal might be a factor why not test them?
Try a file or a hack saw on them. Then cut on a piece of mild steel for comparison. The blade should be noticeably harder.
But don't try it on the front where the metal is all work hardened. Cut it on the back.

Or if it bends so easily, try to straighten it. Put it in a vice and put a big piece of pipe or something on the tip to straighten it. That'll give you an idea of the force it took to bend it in the first place. But watch out! Blades are spring steel. That handle could shoot across the shop if it slips out of your hands, or smack you in the jaw if something breaks.

Dave
 
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