Lawn Care Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An old friend of mine asked me about this grass and how it does in my area. Anyone had experience with it? He is talking about doing some plugs thoughout his yard. Any thoughts and feedback would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
In S. Ohio zoysia doesn't come out of dormancy until mid to late May...sometimes June.

It gets very thatchy if it's habitually over-fertilized with too much N.

After the winters of '76 and '77 (when at 1st temps got down to -25F around here, and then we had the blizzard of '77) virtually all zoysia turf was wiped out in this region for, maybe, the 1st half of the summer of '78.

But...just like Michael Myers...evil never dies! :cool2:
Back then...most people just had their bluegrass lawns dethatched around here. (Core aeration was not really en vogue, yet.)

So, many zoysia grass owners did the same thing with the dethatcher. Or even sod-cut through the dead thatch.
And sure enough, the zoysia beasts were resurrected!

I even had one old customer, a 1st generation German immigrant who's long deceased now, who would take an old fireman's sprayer, fill it with diluted diesel fuel, and (lightly) spray little sections of his zoysia yard.

Then, he'd torch it!
That used to p*** off some of his neighbors, big time!

But he always seemed to know what he was doing. Standing there with his garden hose...just in case.
And he kept the fire within reason, as far as area was concerned.
He must have had clout with the local fire dept...because although they HAD to respond to the alarms & complaints, they reportedly never cited him for anything. :laugh:

Now...That's one heck of a way to get rid of thatch in zoysia! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
I think Springfield might be a little too far north, but it could be worth a shot. I would recommend Compadre seed over any plugs or sprigs. Compadre greens up earlier in the spring and stays greener later in the fall than any other zoysia variety. The others are difficult to start from seed, too. Compadre seed germinates nicely.

Having a zoysia lawn means that you cannot do things when your neighbors do. If you follow the lawn advise given by your local University extension or the knowledgeable old guy down at the landscaping company, you'll probably cause some serious set backs to your lawn. You want to core aerate in mid to late June, a full two months after your neighbors aerate their fescue and bluegrass lawns. You'll waste your money if you fertilize in March or April, but if your neighbors see you fertilizing on the 4th of July, they'll likely call you crazy. If you "winterize" a zoysia lawn in the normal (cool season grass) manner, you just might kill it stone dead.

I'm not trying to discourage you. I love mine, but it is a challenge. I am just a little south of you, in Springfield MO -- zone 6A. There's a battle in the spring to keep the weeds down until the lawn breaks dormancy. And then there's mowing -- it has to be kept short, or it starts getting very thatchy. I cut mine at 2 inches, and in the Dog Days of summer, when fescue and bluegrass are dormant, I have to cut twice a week.

If you decide to do it, do your research and rely on it. If you get "advise" from neighbors or even "experts", make sure that they know you have zoysia and make sure they know what they're talking about.

When I had a fescue lawn, I overseeded every fall, fertilized 3 or 4 times a year, and suffered with brown lawn through the heat of the summer. With my zoysia, I haven't overseeded in 3 years (and won't ever have to), fertilize once a year (and topdress with compost once or twice) and have a beautiful green carpet when everyone else's has withered from the heat -- though mine is brown from mid-November through mid-March.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Having a zoysia lawn means that you cannot do things when your neighbors do.
I think you might agree with me, jeffinsgf, that when you're talking about a specific lawn getting 'plugged' with zoysia in this climate, that it's just a matter of time before the neighbors on either side of that lawn (where the soil is uninterrupted by any width of pavement or concrete) will have a certain amount of zoysia turf in THEIR lawns, too.

And that's been known to pee off a few folks, and sour some neighborhood relations, believe me!

The only thing that will stop it's gradual spread by stolons around here is fairly deep SHADE, and again, pavement that's wide enough (not a sidewalk).
I've seen people try to stop it by using metal edging, etc.
The stuff just crawls right over, around and under it.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top